Acidulant_label.png
ACID_2.jpg
It was said that the first uses of acidulants in foods were discovered by accidents. A thrifty housewife in ancient China found that "spoiled" wine could not only be used to flavor vegetables, but when a few pieces were left in it, they would remain edible for months. However they were discovered, food acidulants have become invaluable in many processed foods. Can you imagine a chewing gum or soft drink with only sweet taste? So obviously we need the sourness to modify the sweet taste of sugar. Acidulants, however, have other useful functions. Learn more...

Here's selected articles to get you off the ground:
  • pHood pHenomena - "Long ago, early cooks stumbled onto the effects of acid-base chemistry. And while at first the nuances of these reactions were mysterious, the concepts of pH control would soon affect and improve the taste, microbiological stability and even the texture of innumerable food products". Read on to learn the basic of controlling pH in food to achieve certain purposes.
  • Smoothing Sourness - If the food or beverage you’re formulating may cause your customers’ faces to pucker, here are eight suggestions on how to reduce that acidic bite. Learn more...
  • Acidifiers With Culture - From kombucha to sports drinks, and kefir to yogurt, acidifiers enhance the flavor and shelf stability of many fermented foods, which often are as diverse and unique as their origins. Read on...
  • Acidifiers Find Functions - This article, from Prepared Foods magazine, presents different examples of acidulant application in various foods.
  • Acidulants in Hot Pack Products - "More and more food manufacturers are turning to hot-pack processing as an alternative to canning. One of the most important aspects of this process is maintaining product pH below 4.5. A number of food ingredients on the market perform this function" (Food Product Design). Read on...

If you would like to explore deeper, get the following articles from the library:
  • Da Conceicao Neta, E.R., Johanningsmeier, S.D., McFeeters, R.R. (2007). The chemistry and physiology of sour taste. A Review. Journal of Food Science, 72(2), R33-R38.


video-icon.jpgVideo on Demand - These are collection of recorded presentation on Prepared Foods website; the presentation is given by industry application specialist on the subject of food acidulants. This is the opportunity to listen to the experienced industry people because we cannot invite them to USM (no budget!). Feel free to listen to any of the presentation. Some of the presentations can be downloaded using Real Player (download the free version). You can even convert it to 3GP format so that you can view it on your handphone!! Hmm...how nice to learn nowadays...learn anywhere, anytime, even when lying on the bed! This is what we call now as mobile learning.

I suggest at least listen to a few presentations below (and the rest I hope you can explore at your convenience):